Some fresh screenshot of uCareSystem caught in action

We love screenshots. Who doesn't ? So I am uploading some fresh screenshots of the latest uCareSystem caught in step-by-step action.

Ok you have downloaded the uCareSystem in a tar.gz file and then you have extracted it in your preferred extraction place. You just need to double-click the "uCareSystem" file and press "Run"

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You will be the asked for your Administrative password to elevate your system rights and be able to do the administrative tasks.

Then uCareSystem will act as a "System Maintenance Assistant":

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It will refresh your package list:

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If there are "Software Update" available you can press "install updates" or else it will be empty and you can press "Close":

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If there are updates and you pressed "install updates", the update manager will start downloading and installing the software updates:

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After it finishes its tasks you can click "Close"

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Then uCareSystemwill automatically :

  • Remove unneeded packages that were automatically installed to satisfy dependencies for some package and that are no more needed.

  • Remove unneeded packages and configuration files which are not required by any other package upon your system

  • Removes all unneeded stored archives in your cache for packages that are no longer in the repositories or that have a newer version in the repositories.

  • Delete from cache the downloaded packages to free up some space


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And last but not least it will optimize you Ram Memory as you can see in the following picture:

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After all the above you can click "OK":

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So that's the magic of uCareSystem. Wanna try it ? Go to our Download Page>>>

Comments

  1. Thank you for this excellent tool.

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  2. Thanks for your kind words, any feedback is appreciated

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  3. Hi Salih.

    Would this force and upgrade e.g. Ubuntu 16.04 to Ubuntu 16.10? I'd rather only stay on LTS releases.

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  4. No, It will never do that. There is no built in command like "sudo update-manager -d" (please dont try it) which will enable regular upgrades.

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  5. @Salih

    Could this script be used to keep a Debian or Ubuntu system automatically updated? For example, have the script run as a cron job about once a week.

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  6. Yes, definitely ! As I have written here, in the introduction http://utappia.org/2016/03/28/ucaresystem-core-v3-0-released-and-available-in-ppa/ you can add it to a cron-job and let it run automatticaly evry once in a while (according to your likings)

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  7. That's excellent. Auto updating is a feature I think GNU/Linux lacks.

    Kudos. :)

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  8. Actually to be fair, there is an auto-upgrade mechanism that you have to enable it. You can check here: https://help.ubuntu.com/lts/serverguide/automatic-updates.html It is really sophisticated but lacks the features besides the apt update/upgrade that ucaresystem-core has.

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  9. Would I have to follow both https://help.ubuntu.com/lts/serverguide/automatic-updates.html and run uCareSystem as a cron or one of the two options?

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  10. Well you can enable the both. This way unattended-upgrades will do the regular upgrades e.g. every 2 days and you can configure ucaresystem-core in a cron job to run once a week to do the rest (cleaning etc) :)

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  11. @Salih

    I hope you don't mind all my questions.

    But ucaresystem-core appears to do everything (and more) that unattended-upgrades does (I'm confused to the real differences).

    Would only using ucaresystem-core update a Debian or Ubuntu system properly?

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  12. I am happy to answer any questions that you may have.

    As for unattended upgrades, I just tried to answere to your question wether or not Linux distributions have any auto-upgrade mechanisms and as I sayed there is the unuttended upgrades features that are present on Ubuntu/Debian based distributions.

    You dont have to use both of them and you are fine using just ucaresystem-core which does what unattended upgrades does plus some more features.

    I am really sorry for any confusion I may have caused to you with my answers.

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  13. I will stick with just uCareSystem as it's far easier to use. Thanks for clarifying that. ;-)

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  14. Hello again Salih.

    uCareSystem does not work on Linux Mint and SolydXK -- I presume it's due to their Update Managers.

    uCareSystem works fine on Ubuntu Mate & Xubuntu. :-)

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  15. Thanks for your valuable feedback. What version of Linux Mint did you tested it on ? And SolydXK, is a Debian based distribution but I couldn't find on which version it is based on ?
    Also did you tested the GUI version or the terminal version ?

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  16. I'm happy to help out. :)

    I tested it on:
    Linux Mint 17.3 MATE
    SolydX (based on Jessie Stable) which was installed from a Nightly build with the ISO file 'solydx_8_64_201511.iso'.

    They both have their own Update Managers built in so this must be the reason.

    I used uCareSystem 3.0 and ran 'ucaresystemcore.sh'.

    I ran it via the terminal with: sudo ./ucaresystemcore.sh

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  17. Ah yes... The GUI version is not up to date, so you should avoid using it. I will update it once I find some free time.

    You should use uCareSystem Core which is more up to date and works on all distributions that are based on Ubuntu 14.04 / Debian 8 and above.

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  18. But I ran 'ucaresystemcore.sh' not 'uCareSystem'. I ran the terminal one (ucaresystemcore.sh), not the GUI one (uCareSystem).

    The Linux Mint & SolydX Update Managers seem to take precedence.

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  19. No, Please go to the first post on the home page and read the post about the new version of uCareSystem Core which is version 3.0 and you can install it either from a PPA (to get new versions) or the deb package.

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  20. Ah I see. I was mixing up 'uCareSystem' with 'uCareSystem Core'. ;-)

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  21. @Salih

    I ran the terminal version and in both cases it says 'uCareSystem Core v3.0' in the terminal. Neither work in Linux Mint nor SolydX -- I doubt this is a fault with uCareSystem though.

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  22. If you would like to help resolve this, you can open an issue on the uCareSystem launchpad page. You will find the link in the post or in the download page

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  23. No, it's ok. I just wanted you to know about it. So as to give feedback on the software.

    In distros that have their own dedicated Update Managers -- I'd probably not use an auto updater like uCareSystem. However uCareSystem is perfect for distros with no dedicated Update Manager -- I'd use uCareSystem in those cases.

    Just my 2 cents.

    Cheers.

    Cheers.

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  24. […] to maintain and update. I recommend uCareSystem to do so with the utmost ease and […]

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